Skip to main content
By Voranai Vanijaka |
Criticised for being undemocratic and overly complicated, Thailand's Senate election concluded with the national-level selection on 26 June. Voranai Vanijaka writes that it failed at completing its purpose, allegedly to prevent vote buying and maintain the Senate's independence from political parties, and that it is a reminder that although Thailand is no longer under a dictatorship, the dictator’s legacy continues to rule.
By Harrison George |
Thailand will soon hold its first Senate election since the 2014 military coup. Our resident satirist Harrison George takes us through what might happen when one tries to run for a seat.
By Thanapat Pekanan |
Can the return of exiled politicians ignite hope for Thai democracy and reshape its political landscape? Thanapat Pekanan argues that Jakrapob Penkair, who recently returned to Thailand after 15 years in exile, could pave the way for the return of political refugees if he could reconcile with the establishment and ensure that the plight of those prosecuted by the royal defamation law is addressed.
By Yukti Mukdawijitra |
Yukti Mukdawijitra, associate professor of anthropology at Thammasat University, writes about his experience in the arraignment room at the South Bangkok Criminal Court after he was indicted on a royal defamation charge filed against him over a tweet from two years ago.
By Harrison George |
Our resident satirist Harrison George returns with another piece on the UK government's plan to deport refugees to Rwanda, and Thailand's need to boost its human rights image.
By Hara Shintaro |
How should the Thai government protect civilians in the country's Deep South? Hara Shintaro writes that dissemination of information about humanitarian principles and International Humanitarian Law could be an effective way to ensure better security for civilians and the Thai authorities should allow activities related to the dissemination of humanitarian principles so that respect for these principles becomes the norm in the conflict area.
By Hara Shintaro |
When Thai Prime Minister Srettha Thavisin met his Malaysian counterpart Anwar Ibrahim in November, they did not discuss the conflict in Thailand's Deep South. As the Thai government prepares for a new round of peace talks, Hara Shintaro writes that there is a need for more public participation in the peace process.
By Hara Shintaro |
The 20-year statute of limitations for the legal cases related to the Tak Bai incident will be running out in October 2024. The incident remains an obstacle to transitional justice in the Deep South, writes Hara Shintaro, as the culture of impunity in the region made it unlikely that justice will be delivered.
By Hara Shintaro |
Since the latest crisis between Palestine and Israel started on 7 October 2023, questions have been raised about what impact the situation in the Middle East might have on Thailand's Deep South. Hara Shintaro writes about the reaction of the insurgent group BRN and other locals to the crisis, noting that it is unlikely the crisis in Palestine will affect the situation in Thailand's Deep South.
By Press Freedom Monitoring in Southeast Asia (PFMSea) |
Following the sentencing of Myanmar Now photojournalist Sai Zaw Thaike to 20 years in prison for dissemination of false information and sedition for reporting on the aftermath of Cyclone Mocha, the Press Freedom Monitoring in Southeast Asia (PFMSea) calls for an immediate and unconditional release of all journalists who have been detained or imprisoned in Myanmar for doing their job.