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By Prachatai |
After the cabinet announced on Tuesday (23 April) that it will require three referendums on amending the constitution, concerns have been raised that a provision prohibiting amendments on monarchy-related chapters in the Constitution will lead to a dead end and raise questions about the role of the monarchy.
By Prachatai |
The parliament has voted against a Move Forward Party (MFP) proposal to hold a referendum on whether a Constitution Drafting Assembly (CDA) should be elected to draft a new constitution.
By Prachatai |
After being informed by the Election Commission of Thailand (ECT) that online signatures would not be accepted, the campaign to petition for a constitutional referendum obtained 212,139 signatures on paper in the space of just 3 days.
By Harrison George |
<p>Election Commissioner Somchai Srisuthiyakorn has attempted to put the kibosh on plans by the UDD to monitor the upcoming referendum.&nbsp; That much was entirely predictable.&nbsp; What was more surprising was the legal justification that he gave for saying that they couldn’t do it.</p> <p>He is reported to have said that the Referendum Act did not expressly permit it.&nbsp;</p> <p>But saying so you can’t do something if the law doesn’t explicitly permit you to do it – that’s complete bullshit.&nbsp;</p>
<div> <p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-87e3ad9a-f4e6-7f03-2884-764a2a1d9dc9">The junta-appointed lawmakers have voted to include a motion on the right of senators to vote to approve PM.&nbsp;</span></p> </div>
By Kornkritch Somjittranukit |
<p><em>Election? Another coup? People’s uprising? Where is Thailand heading? Academics have said that if the military decides to prolong its regime, a people’s uprising is inevitable.&nbsp;</em></p> <p></p>
<div>In an attempt to censor voices against the draft constitution, the junta threatened the Pheu Thai Party after it issued a statement denouncing the draft constitution as undemocratic.&nbsp;</div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div>On Wednesday, 30 March 2016, the Pheu Thai Party issued a statement condemning the final draft of the constitution and urging people to turn it down in the referendum, scheduled in August.</div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div>In response to Pheu Thai’s move, Col Piyapong Klinphan, a spokesperson for the junta, said the junta thanks Pheu Thai for having a clear stance on the draft, but t </div>
<div>The draft referendum bill sets heavy sentences for denouncing the referendum or publishing polls predicting the result too close to voting day on August 7. </div>
By Kornkritch Somjittranukit |
<div>The anti-Thaksin civil society has condemned the junta government for issuing orders that intentionally benefit big construction projects which affect locals, and has urged people to use the upcoming referendum as a bargaining chip against the junta.</div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div>Academics and civil society state that NCPO Orders 3/2016, 4/2016 and 9/2016, which were issued using the power of Article 44 of 2014 interim charter, are turning Thailand into a capitalists’ paradise. </div>
By Pravit Rojanaphruk |
<div>Can the expected referendum on whether to allow the military regime of General Prayut Chan-o-cha to stay for two more years "legitimise" the government?</div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div>Some say yes, as they argue that this time, unlike in the coup Prayut forced on people last year, the electorate will have a say through a plebiscite instead of obeying the guns and orders of coup makers.</div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div>Many have already decided to give a blank cheque to the military strongman and leader of the National Council for Peace and Order - who later chose himself to become prime minister fo </div>
By Harrison George |
<p>Trial lawyers, so I am told, are warned to be careful about what questions to ask witnesses.&nbsp; They are advised never to ask a question unless they are confident about what the answer will be.</p> <p>Not so journalists, so I don’t suppose we can berate the reporter who decided to ask Prime Minister and junta leader Gen Prayut Chan-o-cha if there was enough money for a referendum on the draft constitution.</p>
By Taweesak Kerdpoka |
<p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-ef13f757-4b0b-8287-adf0-5498f9192ae8">With uncertainty about whether the Thai junta will hold a public referendum on the draft constitution or impose it without public consent, alternative media outlets and think tanks in Thailand came together to open an online forum titled ‘Prachamati’ (referendum) to let people speak their mind about the draft constitution which is currently being debated by the junta’s National Reform Council (NRC).</span></p> <p></p>